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Old Jun 11, 2004, 11:19 PM   #11
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My FZ10 is in for warranty repair, but it's great that you have finally provided a good reason to have "video" on a still cam! Actually, I've been in video for many years and have a GL1 in my bag, a 3CCD video camera that takes terrible still shots but captures nice video, and the audio is okay as well. Maybe I'll start carting that around as well just for fun. In any event, when I'm using the DSLR I can still record the sounds with the GL1. It's a challenge, thanks for bringing it up!

Here's an ugly photo of a bird that sounded different to me today. Any suggestions?


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Old Jun 12, 2004, 1:55 AM   #12
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Yikes, Norm, I did say I have 27 years of rust to shake off, didn't I? ...and now you present us with an image like that? ...and ask us to identify the bird?

Without anything else to go on (you are on the east coast, right?), I look at that picture and see these as identifying characteristics:

1. Long tail that is notched.
2. A beak that is longer and sleek, very unlike a sparrow's beak - not good for eating seeds.
3. A dark beak, both top and bottom, so far as I can tell from the photo.
4. Lack of breast striping, so far as I can tell from the photo.
5. What "appears" to be a rusty crown, but I don't know if I believe that - I think it may be just appearance due to the poor quality.
6. Lack of an eye ring.
7. I can't see the top of the wings, so I can't draw any conclusions from that except that it "seems" that the wings do not extend very far down along the length of the tail.

So, where does this lead me? I have some strong suspicions, but before I commit, could you answer these questions:

1. Was this bird larger than the Empidonax flycatcher in the first photo above?
2. Did the bird continually bob its tail as it was perched there?
3. You say that the song of the bird was different sounding - could you possibly try and describe it phonetically?
4. What kind of habitat was the bird in when you photographed it?
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Old Jun 12, 2004, 7:49 AM   #13
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Does the FZ10 "memo mode" allow you to record for as long as you want so that the sound can be attached to the particular file? I guess I could use/strip the sound I could record with the video function the FZ10 has as well. The small movies don't make it.

I have a minidisc recorder which records accurate sound and I wish I had taken it on a bird walk I did recently. Our guide kept listening and then sometimes seeing and then showing us the bird. Most of the time (I think because our group was too large), we never saw the bird. I would have liked to record the bird songs and the other ambient sounds we heard.

The minidisc is easy to use and very light. It is quite easy to stick my still images in a slide show with the sounds by using video recording software. I actually like "videos" made from stills with sound and voice over compared to editing a poor quality home video.
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Old Jun 12, 2004, 9:05 AM   #14
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SoOregon wrote:
Quote:
Our guide kept listening and then sometimes seeing and then showing us the bird. Most of the time (I think because our group was too large), we never saw the bird. I would have liked to record the bird songs and the other ambient sounds we heard.
That's a trait of experienced birders - their experience allows them to actually do most of their id in the field via the bird vocalizations. I think that at the height of my birding I probably did 80-90% of my identification via auditory rather than visual cues. Unfortunately, if you don't continually refresh your memory, anything other than the more common bird vocalizations tend to be forgotten. For example, who can ever forget the sound of an ovenbird in the forest?
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Old Jun 12, 2004, 11:43 AM   #15
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1. Was this bird larger than the Empidonax flycatcher in the first photo above?Yes, it was the size of a robin

2. Did the bird continually bob its tail as it was perched there?

I don't recall


3. You say that the song of the bird was different sounding - could you possibly try and describe it phonetically?

Hmm, as you say above, it's easy to forget. I would only be guessing. I'm heading to the same spot today for awhile so hopefully I'll see it again and be able to get a better photo. Birds that I've spotted in the same location, though, are: yellow warbler, cowbird, cedar waxwing, blackbird, pileated woodpecker, hairy woodpecker, the above birds.


4. What kind of habitat was the bird in when you photographed it?

Deciduous forest, on the bank of a small lake in central Alberta, Canada

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Old Jun 13, 2004, 8:12 PM   #16
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geoffs, here's a bit better shot of that bird that I got today. Any ideas? I think I've seen thisbird in a book but I'm lazy and don't feel like looking into it since I have you experts around to do all of that sort of stuff.



While we're at it, here area couple more that Iphotographed today that I'm not sure of. Thefirst one is through a whole pile of shrubs and it seems to have coloration like an Oriel but something is different about it beyond that. The second one seems to have a "grossbeak" type.



Next one




Any ident help would be appreciated, thanks
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Old Jun 13, 2004, 8:43 PM   #17
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Norm, here's some comments about the new pictures:

1. This one is simple. It's a Gray Catbird and a good capture of one. I would never have imagined that the first picture of it you posted was the same bird.

2. I think your intuition on this one was spot on. This looks to me like an immature Northern Oriole.

3. You've got me good on this last one. It's probably a female or juvenal bird which if I had to hazard a guess could possibly be:

a. juvenal cowbird - underside and beak seem too dark to me
b. juvenal towhee - but see no wing pattern and can't see tail

Perhaps Hummer could add his expert opinion...

(Norm, it would help if you could try and describe the size of the birds you photograph).


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Old Jun 13, 2004, 8:48 PM   #18
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geoffs, good suggestion on size. The size of the second one is large sparrow sized, and the last one is the size of a small blackbird or a large sparrow. PS - I knew I'd spelled Oriole wrong, I do it every time.
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Old Jun 13, 2004, 8:50 PM   #19
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Well, the size of the bird in the 3rd picture being small blackbird or large sparrow doesn't rule out either one of my guesses. I'll wait and see if Hummer comes to the rescue...
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Old Jun 13, 2004, 8:53 PM   #20
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Sounds good, thanks for the input and handy that you just happened to be online now. Hummer's probably out trekking the mountain areas.
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