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Old Jun 22, 2004, 2:53 AM   #1
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Having looked through many posts by the above mentioned fellows, I thought I would give it a go, just the G3 with the 2 by on. Pretty hard going as I had to get myself a reasonable distance from the birds in my back yard even to see them. I can really see the talent involved in catching these smaller birds who seem to fly at 100 miles an hour:-)



This is a little honey eater I managed to catch, he was very quick and I only got the two shots:-)he was a cheeky little devil and watched me the whole time.







This was just before he took off.




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Old Jun 22, 2004, 3:37 AM   #2
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Nice one Julie, i like number 1 it's like you and him are playing hide and seek. :-)I've seen the shots from Normcar and Eric Can, I don't know how they do it after watching the birds in my garden. The birds never seem to stand still for more than a couple of seconds and it must take a lot of patience to get good shots of them. :-)
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Old Jun 22, 2004, 4:34 AM   #3
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noticed the purple fringing so photoshopped it



here is updated version




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Old Jun 22, 2004, 8:56 AM   #4
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I like the first shot of the bird peeking under the branch to get a look at you. Nice catch!
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Old Jun 22, 2004, 9:05 AM   #5
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Way to go, Julie. You can understand why Norm and Eric and Hummer use those really long lenses to get their great shots - a G2 with a 2x Kenko telextender still doesn't get you close enough to most birds (I had exact same setup), but you got this guy pretty good.

I'm not worth a darn when it comes to id'ing anything other than North American birds, so I'm glad you mentioned itwas a honey eater :-)
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Old Jun 22, 2004, 11:53 AM   #6
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Bird photography is very hard, I think you did quite well. I like the first shot more than the second for two reasons. First is that you can see its face. The second is that I like the expression. You can imagine what its doing by those eyes and body language.

You did a good job memoving the purple fringing. Well done.

One thing that is still there, though, is a sharpening halo. Notice around the dark back of the bird there is a slightly lighter "halo" of white which is lighter than the background? That is caused by over sharpening, or not selectively sharpening. There are two ways that I know of to prevent this (in photoshop.) One is to use the magic wand and select only the bird and sharpen just that (you might have to shrink the selection region.) The other solution is to zoom way in and clone the background color over the lightened area (or just use the pencle with the right color selected.) Personally, I do it the first way.

Eric
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Old Jun 22, 2004, 3:37 PM   #7
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That is one very cool bird, Julie, good going. His eyes and aggressive posture reminds me of our Northern Mockingbird. Personally, I have little patience for sitting in blinds for long periods and find much more fun and adventure by stalking and opportunistically shooting whatever comes along. In both photos and paintings, I prefer scenes which appear as natural as I see them with my eye, and the stalk and shoot style seems to best produce this.

Keep pursuing on that little honeyeater and before long you will get some remarkable shots. Someday I hope to make it to your part of the world....

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Old Jun 22, 2004, 5:14 PM   #8
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Neat Julie, agree with the gang, the 1st one is the one I prefer.

The key to birding is not magical, it takes a lot of commitment to this kind of photography, lots of patience.. did I say patience, add more. If you have a tree near by, start by sitting there, try to figure out where the bird would make a nice photo, view mentaly how it would turn out - considering the background in the picture. Then just wait and wait. Eventually they won't notice your presence, at least they won't feel threatened. Its at this point where you can start to have fun shooting them. Even if you don't have a super zoom, you can make some neat photos. Try lowest ISO possible, highest shutter speed possible - I know it souds contradictory, its all about compromise.

I gave long time ago shooting handheld, a tripod always lead to better results, even a 3 way head tripod when used properly can lead to satisfactory results. If your shot was quite crisp and sharp, because you use a tripod and faster shutter speed, then you can make up for the smaller bird (in the frame) by enlarging this to a point in PS.

If you do have Photoshop, let me know. Got some effective way to sharpen things up without having nasty side effects created when using simpler method.

Cheers
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Old Jun 22, 2004, 5:22 PM   #9
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Eric CAN wrote:
Quote:
I gave long time ago shooting handheld, a tripod always lead to better results, even a 3 way head tripod when used properly can lead to satisfactory results. If your shot was quite crisp and sharp, because you use a tripod and faster shutter speed, then you can make up for the smaller bird (in the frame) by enlarging this to a point in PS.

If you do have Photoshop, let me know. Got some effective way to sharpen things up without having nasty side effects created when using simpler method.
Eric, if a 3-way tripod head is not optimal, what kind of head would you recommend (ie: what do you use)? I have a Bogen 3036 tripod and a light-duty 3-way head currently.

I'd also be interested in your Photoshop sharpening techniques.

Geoff
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Old Jun 22, 2004, 5:46 PM   #10
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geoffs wrote:
Quote:
Eric CAN wrote:
Quote:
I gave long time ago shooting handheld, a tripod always lead to better results, even a 3 way head tripod when used properly can lead to satisfactory results. If your shot was quite crisp and sharp, because you use a tripod and faster shutter speed, then you can make up for the smaller bird (in the frame) by enlarging this to a point in PS.

If you do have Photoshop, let me know. Got some effective way to sharpen things up without having nasty side effects created when using simpler method.
Eric, if a 3-way tripod head is not optimal, what kind of head would you recommend (ie: what do you use)? I have a Bogen 3036 tripod and a light-duty 3-way head currently.

I'd also be interested in your Photoshop sharpening techniques.

Geoff

Hmm I think for birding, a more expensive ball head would be a better solution, I use a 3-way manfrotto head right now, the problem is the front angle where it goes only to 30 deg, to get higher, I need to turn the head arround, unlatch the lens mount, then install this the other way around, I hate that since my control is not good at all.

It's not my technique, but I employ them alot : USM anda new trick I usea lot now is by using Filter - HighPass. I'll explain this in a seperate thread.

Cheers
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