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Old Jul 4, 2004, 8:06 PM   #1
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And a last one, got one 'in the open', it's very hard to catch them without interference of tree leaves, was fun today



The last one was slightly blurred, 1/800 sec would have done it. All the shots above were taken at ISO400, but all were 'exposed to the right' so even the full size print won't show noise. I didn't apply any blur tools for all these shots, too complicated when there's so much in and out of focus objects, LOL

For Geoff, I've seen a Swainson's Trush, I took 2 shots but the contrast between where he was and the background was too high, both were terribly OOF, discarded the photos on the spot.

I was out there for the entire day, it became cloudy in mid-day, decided I had some keepers already and I didn't eat enough in the morning, I was out of juice. Things to remember, never ever walk down the forrest where the area is normally flooded in the spring. The soil was still mushy and mosquitos were happy campers. LOL

For the week, working daytime, so I'll try to go to the area after 4h30 when weather permits.

Cheers everyone
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Old Jul 4, 2004, 8:47 PM   #2
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Eric, these waxwing shots are superb. The fine detail visible in their feathers is so well resolved! It seems like you had a very fruitful (just coincidence I used that word) day in the woods.

How did you recognize the Swainson's Thrush, Eric? Their song is very distinctive and is usually what gives their position away. Too bad you couldn't catch them where the background was suitable for some good shots. There will always be a next time though.

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...never ever walk down the forrest where the area is normally flooded in the spring. The soil was still mushy and mosquitos were happy campers...
Ah, yes... I've been there and done that in the Adirondack Mountains in northern New York State (south of Lake Placid), except instead of getting eaten alive by mosquitos it was black fly hordes!

A question, Eric: How much of a crop off of the original resolutions were these pictures of the waxwings?
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Old Jul 4, 2004, 9:32 PM   #3
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Hi Geoff, I reckoned the Swainson's with its distinctive pattern and most importantly the song it did.

As for the crop, I try to avoid cropping my shots. What I do with my raw software is , I set the crop to 10x8 (for prints) 256 dpi and I simply frame the image. So what happen is I loose a portion of the whole image only. The 1st and 3rd image were done this way. Thelast one was slightly cropped more (so its enlarged). And the2nd one is as is. 3:2 ratio, no enlargement.

I noticed most error we do is hoping by croping (enlarging) would bring same level of details as closer shots. If I need to crop, I have a threshold were I don't go beyond, since it will show that the bird doesn't have the details compared to a closer shot one. So you'll see often that my birds are smaller, but that's because I want to preserve the details as is.

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Old Jul 4, 2004, 9:38 PM   #4
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Excellent shots, I love the berry eating action and beautiful movement of light dispersed.
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Old Jul 4, 2004, 9:46 PM   #5
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Thanks Norm, how was your day today ?

You are much more productive than me for birding, wonder what's your secret, LOL.

I have many species on my list now, those I reckoned by view or by sound. Have you seen this website before ? Was brought up by Geoff few weeks ago. It's quite invaluable what information it brings :

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/program...rds/BirdGuide/

Click on BIRD GUIDE then look around for all these species.

Here's the Swanson's Trush song :

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/program...ons_Thrush.ram

Betcha you heard that before

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Old Jul 4, 2004, 9:46 PM   #6
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Ohh Geoff, while looking on All about Birds website, there was a distinctive song I could hear today, never been able to know what it was. It's the Ovenbird, I read they are seldom seen.

So here's the challenge of the month, the first one that can bring a photo of that bird wins the prize

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/program...bird.html#fig1

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Old Jul 4, 2004, 10:29 PM   #7
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Eric CAN wrote:
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Ohh Geoff, while looking on All about Birds website, there was a distinctive song I could hear today, never been able to know what it was. It's the Ovenbird, I read they are seldom seen.

So here's the challenge of the month, the first one that can bring a photo of that bird wins the prize
First, thanks for the information on your cropping strategy. I wasn't sure to what degree your lenses were getting you in close to the birds you were photographing, but now I know - very close! If you saw the female mallard photos I posted, well, those were from images that I cropped to only 10% of the pixels that originally existed. That's how hard it is to get in close with the equipment I've got. Now, I know that I will never achieve even close results to what the rest of you are getting until I start saving money towards a better setup.

Next... ovenbirds are common in the eastern and northern forests and have been seen in most western states, except for Oregon where I live, naturally :-( It's easy to know that they are around because of their song, but as you stated, much more difficult to actually spot visually. I've seen them many times when I lived in the east but you have to be persistent. Getting a photo of one of them will be very difficult because my experience is that they don't stay in one place for long.

What do you propose as the prize for the first ovenbird photo? :-)
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Old Jul 4, 2004, 10:40 PM   #8
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Excellent shots. I can't believe the detail you always get in your shots.

I still think you must have some sort of cloaking device to get so close.

Thanks for sharing. Those waxwings are hard to beat for being a very pretty bird.

Makes me almost embarrassed to post the shots I am going to be posting in a few minutes of my western tanager. Luckily I am not restrained by anyone having high expectations of the quality of my pics. Chuckle Chuckle.
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Old Jul 5, 2004, 1:11 AM   #9
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geoffs wrote:
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What do you propose as the prize for the first ovenbird photo? :-)
I try not to make a habit of replying to my own message, but in this case...

Eric, I will offer up the following prize to the first among you guys to produce a frameable picture of an ovenbird:

Stokes Field Guide To Bird Songs: Eastern Region

...or...

Stokes Field Guilde To Bird Songs: Western Region

How does that sound to you?
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Old Jul 5, 2004, 3:03 PM   #10
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I hate to say this, but I have several pictures of oven birds. Here is one that I already have edited up.
http://www.marx7.org/~esmith/menotom...at3/index.html

The oven bird is the third in on the left on the bottom.

This isn't "frameable", as my definition of frameable demands higher quality than this shot. I don't know what your definition of frameable is. But I have some which are. I'll just have to go and edit them up. Give me a little time.

But to the point at hand, very nice shots Eric. I do love Cedar Waxings. I have some shots of one eating dinner, but they are from front on and I don't think work as well as these.

You have the same problem with them that I do. There is a touch of white (pure white) just on the back edge of the beak. So when the face is in sunlight it blows out that spot. The first picture doesn't have the problem 'cause it isn't in sunlight (that part any ways.) The rest do. I haven't found a way around this problem, and I'm thinking that I shouldn't... that there isn't a way.

EDIT: I just reread my comment and I just wanted to add that in these pictures the white spot is very small, but in mine, 'cause it was in full on afternoon sunlight, it bloomed and was noticably large. An example can be found here:
http://www.marx7.org/~esmith/web_pos...r_waxwing2.jpg

Eric
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