Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > Wildlife Photos

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jul 28, 2004, 11:54 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
geoffs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 2,025
Default

I've gotten involved with an organization that is trying to reestablish viable populations of the Western Bluebird in the valleys of western Oregon. Today I got to go out for about 6 hours to monitor a bunch of bluebird nesting boxes. Several adults were trapped and banded as well as about a dozen nestlings. These are not spectacular wildlife shots, but they do illustrate some of the work that is being done to help species that have been impacted negatively over the last century.

Here's a female waiting to be banded after having taken the bait (mealworms) with a trap:


Here's the same female in the process of having the band placed on her right leg:


I wish I'd gotten pictures of the nestlings. They were ugly and cute at the same time, but what little miracles of life they were!


geoffs is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jul 29, 2004, 12:11 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 3,748
Default

Great photos of a supremely dynamic objective and task. I can almost hear that bluebird in the last photo saying,

okay, this isn't the most fun thing I've done, but these people are on my side so I'll go for it.

Keep the photos coming on this, congrats on an excellent direction.
Normcar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 29, 2004, 12:16 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
geoffs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 2,025
Default

Thanks for looking and commenting, Norm. I appreciate it!

Normcar wrote:
Quote:
I can almost hear that bluebird in the last photo saying,

"okay, this isn't the most fun thing I've done, but these people are on my side so I'll go for it."
Perhaps she was thinking that, but I couldn't help but think as we were doing this stuff that she was really saying to herself:

"Why didn't I listen to my inner conscience and not take those last few steps into that darn trap!"
geoffs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 29, 2004, 12:36 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 3,748
Default

Little did she know that trap was her safe place. I've been around birds long enough now that I can say, with a certain amount of conviction, that they know when they are threatened and they know when they are not. It's quite cool, actually. I don't think I've ever in my life gotten as close to birds as I now do and I think that the reason that I can get so close, or they choose to get close to me is that be both know that we are not a threat to one another.

Hmm, I wonder if I'll ever get that close to bears?

Not!
Normcar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 29, 2004, 12:42 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
geoffs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 2,025
Default

Normcar wrote:
Quote:
Hmm, I wonder if I'll ever get that close to bears?

Not!
This brought to mind a story that one of my professors in the wildlife program I was in in college related to us. He was doing research on polar bears, somewhat further north of where you are. His job was to find the polar bear dens where they were hibernating in winter (with their young) and crawl into the den with a pole that would have a hypodermic on the end, to tranquilize the bear and then carry out the measurements needed. The hope was that the bear was groggy enough to not be a danger. Well, that's not the way it turned out on one of his jaunts. The bear was wide awake and tried to go for him. All this guy had on him was a .22 pistol and he used it, letting off a perfect shot into the eye socket of the bear, killing it immediately. He had the skull to show us as proof.

Now, you definitely would not catch me doing that sort of research! My undies would be soiled long before I started crawling into the den...
geoffs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 29, 2004, 5:00 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 3,748
Default

That's a sad story. A damned sad story. So, had that person not attempted to stamp the animal, it would have survived. The bear died because someone couldn't stamp it properly?

Just asking a question. I'm probably not getting the whole picture and would love you to elaborate and expand, thanks geoff. Honest, I need some elaboration on this one, thanks.
Normcar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 29, 2004, 8:42 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
geoffs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 2,025
Default

Well, it is a sad story, Norm. Your talk about getting close to bears brought to mind how close that professor had come to bears.

Animal research isn't always benign. Depending on the animal being researched, there can be great danger for the investigator and/or the animal. In this case, it was the animal that had to sacrifice. The research was being done at a time when polar bear populations had been severely reduced and the gathering of information was quite important in contributing to management decisions that could help it on the road to recovery and the prevention of human/bear interactions. So, although there was an element of recklessness on the part of the researcher, the entire effort could still be characterized as "for the greater good of the polar bear population".

Like I mentioned, though, you wouldn't catch me doing that type of research!
geoffs is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 3:42 PM.