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Old Sep 4, 2004, 10:35 PM   #1
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I went out this morning with people from a local birding group I'm in. We saw so many great things I lost track. I'm still sifting through the 100+ pictures I took. This is probably one of the best, a lovely warbler. A quick look through my book didn't help me with the ID. It's in fall plumage which makes it tricky... I really saw nothing like it the book I've got which shows "all" plumages (well, almost) and is normally great for this type of Id.

My only two nits to pick are the branch in the lower left and that I wish I was more stright on instead of slightly below it. Nothing I can do about the second and I don't have the time to clone out the branch (gotta get to bed for another morning birding trip.)

I hope you all like it. I don't recall the settings, I hope to add them tomorrow.

Eric
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Old Sep 4, 2004, 10:51 PM   #2
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i hope you don't mind me doing this..

i'm just trying to help....i've deleted them from my system....

but i cloned it for you...and sharpened a bit...

GREAT shot i don't mind the angle...you can't help that anyway..plus...you got brilliant DOF on this one

Vito
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Old Sep 4, 2004, 11:57 PM   #3
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Great shot of a beautiful little warbler, Eric! In fact, you got a picture of a good one as far as I'm concerned. This looks to be a Prairie Warbler, probably a female based on the weaker black stripe going through the eye and the lack of any chestnut highlights on the bird's back.

Wow, I love the fall warbler migrations!

(Vito, good job cloning out the OOF branch and adjusting sharpness!)
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Old Sep 5, 2004, 4:25 AM   #4
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lovely shot, looks a bit like a canary.
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Old Sep 5, 2004, 10:42 AM   #5
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Vito
The reason I didn't sharpen it more was because of the halo. Look along the back of the bird and over its head. See the lighter line that follows the bird? That is what happens from over sharpening. There are easy ways around it and it was just too late in the evening to bother with them. This is the way I like to avoid it.

Select the sky with the magic wand and then invert the selection. That should select the bird and branch. Subtract the off the branch with the laso.
Shrink the selected region by 1 pixel. Then sharpen as you normally would. That will prevent the sharpening halo.

The back of the head and neck feathers are better defined in your version, so I like it. But you have to be ever vigilant of halos. I (and many others) find they look bad.

If you have to, you can use the magic wand at a really low setting (5 or 10) and then select the halo (you'll have to zoom in to about 400% to make this easy.) Then you can clone sky over them. This takes a long time and can make the subject look cut/pasted into the picture... which can look REALLY bad. I've read from others (much better than I) that for larger prints this effect doesn't happen so it can work well for that. But on screen I've seen the look and it's really weird.

Ya, I really nailed the DOF... gotta love it when that works out.

Geoffs, I believe you're right, it's a prarie warbler. I would lean towards male, but I'm not positive. This is the first one I've seen, so I'm no expert.

Eric
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Old Sep 5, 2004, 10:51 AM   #6
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eric s wrote:
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Geoffs, I believe you're right, it's a prarie warbler. I would lean towards male, but I'm not positive. This is the first one I've seen, so I'm no expert.
Eric, this is one id with regard to male/female where you need to consult several different field guides. For example, Sibley has the Prairie Warbler but doesn't really delve into difference between male and female. In Peterson's it is described and from the description there I have to lean more towards female than male. But, it is fall warbler season so, really, who can be absolutely sure?


Oh, and thank you for those sharpening instructions with a method for avoiding the halo!
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Old Sep 5, 2004, 11:11 PM   #7
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i think an easier way, would be layer masking...

and just cancel out the sharpening there..

vito
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Old Sep 5, 2004, 11:26 PM   #8
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You really think it would be easier to erase the edges where the halo was created over using a selection region to avoid creating it in the first place? (Assuming I understand you correctly.)

You could be right (I'll try it) but I don't think it will be. Creating the selection region and shrinking it is really, really easy. I was just lazy and tired so I didn't do it on this picture.

Eric
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Old Sep 5, 2004, 11:51 PM   #9
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ohhh no...i mean after you sharpen...just use a layer mask on that layer (with a non-sharpened duplicate of the layer) and paint in black where the halo is...

i dunno...you're way is sounding faster

Vito
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Old Sep 5, 2004, 11:54 PM   #10
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Actually, I just tried Eric's method on the image Eric originally posted. This was in PSE2, of course, since I don't own PSCS. In any case, it seemed pretty simple and quick to get a relatively good result. The only problem I had was in using the lasso tool to subtract the selection from the branches because where the branches intersected with the warbler's feet, it was tough to retain the correct selection. Any suggestions, Eric?
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