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Old Sep 7, 2004, 9:44 PM   #1
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I was digging through some old pictures because I was donating some shots to a friend for a presentation she was giving. I bumped into this shot and though... that has potential. I'm generally happy with the results, especially since it was hand-held with my older 100-400 lens.

I had trouble keeping away artifacts both because it was taken as a jpg and the challenge of keeping the noise in shadow part from showing up.

What do you think? I like how the shadow just cuts across behind the beak... pure luck, but I think it works. I had a different version where I lightened the shadow a touch, but I concluded I liked it like this. Now that I look at it, I'm not so sure....

Camera: Canon 10D, 100-400 @400, 1/500 f6.7 ISO200, handheld, JPG
Photoshop: crop (70% of orig), curves, reduce, selective sharpening

Eric
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Old Sep 7, 2004, 9:50 PM   #2
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ohh....nice one!

i do like the shadow! i think you made the most out of a tough situation!

nice sharpness and detail in this one..

gj!

btw...is your 600mm a prime or zoom?

Vito
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Old Sep 7, 2004, 10:05 PM   #3
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I'm glad you like it. It was a difficult set of shots.

My 600mm is a prime. Canon doesn't make any zooms that go to 600mm, but Sigma does (and they are surprisingly good.)

Here is another, much harder shot of this same hawk. This time, from behind!


Getting the exposure comp right was really hard on this shot. I needed to not blow out the sky and not get the back so dark it had detail. I took many shots at different settings before I settled on this one.

In this one I found that no curves/contrast work was necessary. Even when I isolated it to the bird I found it either darkened it too much & made the brown look wrong or the whites were too bright. That is when I concluded I like it like this.

Camera: 10D [email protected], 1/500, f5.6, exposure comp +1, ISO400, JPG, tripod
PhotoShop: neatimage, crop (50% of original), reduce, selective sharpen

Eric
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Old Sep 7, 2004, 10:13 PM   #4
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oh! i love the pose of the second one! it's like a death glare!

good job with exposure on this one too!

hmm...i guess you have to back up if the 600mm is too close (could youEVER be too close? lol)...

Vito
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Old Sep 7, 2004, 10:49 PM   #5
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Actually, the real killer on the 600mm is that its minimum focusing distance is about 18 feet. So it is very easy to get too close with the more friendly birds. Or if they are really big (herons) and you want to get their entire reflection in water and the bird.

Yep, the only solution on the bigger birds is to back up. For the smaller ones that are too close you can use an extention tube. That allows for closer focusing, but you loose infinity focus.

Glad you like the shot(s).

Eric
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Old Sep 8, 2004, 2:51 AM   #6
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good details in the #1 and real attitude in the #2, bravo
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Old Sep 8, 2004, 9:12 AM   #7
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eric s wrote:
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Yep, the only solution on the bigger birds is to back up. For the smaller ones that are too close you can use an extention tube. That allows for closer focusing, but you loose infinity focus.
Ach! I should have such problems! :roll:

Nice shots, Eric, given the light conditions when you took this shot. The hawk wouldn't move completely into the shadows or into the light when you asked it, I bet... :blah: I like the first shot better for it's overall better detail but, like the others said, in the second shot the bird's glare at you adds to the mood.
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Old Sep 8, 2004, 9:43 AM   #8
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I just looked at these pictures from work, on an uncalibrated monitor. Wow, they are dark. There was a lot more detail visible in head of the first hawk... I like these shots much better at home.

I don't often have the problem of getting too close. But when the heron is 30'ish feet away and you want to get its entire reflection it doesn't work. And some times the reflection is better than the bird!

Eric
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Old Sep 8, 2004, 10:05 AM   #9
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disappointed this way, I cant see the photos:sad:
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Old Sep 8, 2004, 12:49 PM   #10
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They loaded for me, but they were probably in my disk cache. Let me try to access them directly from another browser....

Nope, they loaded in netscape too (and I know that wasn't from the cache.)

Sorry, I don't know what to tell you.

Eric
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