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Old Jul 24, 2006, 11:41 PM   #1
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I took this pic on a walk the other day and thought it was nice. Is it a moth or butterfly?
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Old Jul 25, 2006, 5:24 PM   #2
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RP33 wrote:
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I took this pic on a walk the other day and thought it was nice. Is it a moth or butterfly?
I would say a Butterfly. Moths have little tufts at the end of their antennas, whereas butterflys just have a little bump.

Pretty picture!

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Old Jul 25, 2006, 11:16 PM   #3
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Scientifically there is no difference between moths and butterflies, why there are two categories, no one is certain, as the two categories exist in most languages and date back quite a ways.

Excerpt from Wikipedia

"
A moth is an insect closely related to the butterfly. Both are of the orderLepidoptera. The division of Lepidopterans into moths and butterflies is a popular taxonomy, not a scientific one. "

-Travis-
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Old Jul 25, 2006, 11:19 PM   #4
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WOW

This got deep in a hurry.
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Old Jul 25, 2006, 11:25 PM   #5
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haha, sorry

just trying to pass on knowledge that highschool gave me.

Science class was one of the few classes i actually liked.
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Old Jul 25, 2006, 11:32 PM   #6
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tswen wrote:
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haha, sorry

just trying to pass on knowledge that highschool gave me.

Science class was one of the few classes i actually liked.
Sometimes, that ol High School science may be wrong:

Shape and structure of antennae

The most obvious difference is in the feelers, or antennae. Most butterflies have thin slender filamentous antennae which are club shaped at the end. Moths, on the other hand, often have comb-like or feathery antennae, or filamentous and unclubbed. This distinction is the basis for the non-standard taxonomic divisions in the Lepidoptera - the Rhopalocera ("clubbed horn", the butterflies) and the Heterocera ("varied horn", the moths)."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Differe...fly_and_a_moth


The article Does go on to say that a handful of butterfly's also have feathery antennae...

Essentially, they are very similar forms, but of course, you could say that about antelope and deer. Often enough, what is called an antelope is "actually" a deer.

Dave
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Old Jul 25, 2006, 11:32 PM   #7
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tswen wrote:
Quote:
haha, sorry

just trying to pass on knowledge that highschool gave me.

Science class was one of the few classes i actually liked.
Sometimes, that ol High School science may be wrong:

Shape and structure of antennae

The most obvious difference is in the feelers, or antennae. Most butterflies have thin slender filamentous antennae which are club shaped at the end. Moths, on the other hand, often have comb-like or feathery antennae, or filamentous and unclubbed. This distinction is the basis for the non-standard taxonomic divisions in the Lepidoptera - the Rhopalocera ("clubbed horn", the butterflies) and the Heterocera ("varied horn", the moths)."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Differe...fly_and_a_moth


The article Does go on to say that a handful of butterfly's also have feathery antennae...

Essentially, they are very similar forms, but of course, you could say that about antelope and deer. Often enough, what is called an antelope is "actually" a deer.

Dave
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Old Jul 25, 2006, 11:45 PM   #8
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I agree there are differences, but after research there are almost exceptions to all the differences. Here is the best article i found on the subject

http://www.answers.com/topic/differe...fly-and-a-moth
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Old Jul 26, 2006, 11:26 AM   #9
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tswen wrote:
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I agree there are differences, but after research there are almost exceptions to all the differences. Here is the best article i found on the subject

http://www.answers.com/topic/differe...fly-and-a-moth
The man who created this nice photograph asked a simple question.

Is it a moth or a butterfly? An entomologist would, without any hesitation reply, "That's a Butterfly."

Within the Lepidoptera, there are many specific genus, and in none of these do you find BOTH Moths and Butterflys.


Dave
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Old Jul 26, 2006, 8:09 PM   #10
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I guess I should have just asked if the picture I took was any good.
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