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Old Jan 6, 2006, 11:49 PM   #11
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This highlights my point a little, this background is more effectual than the black or white, the change of colors breaks it up for the ye and makes a better blend. You did a good job I just wanted to try extract (not a normal choice for me) on this one. NOt sure if my monitor at work has gone out of wack over the Christmas break or my etes are tired tonight but mine does not look as good as I thought it did when I posted..lol The shadow is too heavy not allowing some of the finer hair detail to show. I did want it to hide some of that area but looks like I went a little overkill, but you get the idea.



edit: reposted the image above. had the wrong layer turned on, was my experiment layer..oops.
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Old Jan 7, 2006, 12:51 AM   #12
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you all did great, I can only practice....dream... SUCCEED... hopefully anyhow...thanks for the instructions.



I seem to, when selecting through the colour range...to select colour that is not green, and I will get "knockouts" (is that what they are called) in the body of the subject? do I just paint them back in?? I think this is where my confusion lies now?


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Old Jan 7, 2006, 3:20 AM   #13
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If you follow the steps I put down, then you should be turning that color range selection into a mask. You can paint white into the mask to restore areas that it masked out but you want to keep. If you deleted the selection instead of masking, you can restore parts of the picture using the history brush.

Make sure your fuzziness isn't too high on the color range selection, the higher it is the more likely it is to select dissimilar colors. Oh, and I think I forgot to mention, before you do anything select the eyedropper tool and change it's sample size to "5x5 average". If it's set to point sample that can screw up any color selections you make because it could pick a pixel that is off color (like if there's any noise in your picture).
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Old Jan 9, 2006, 12:14 PM   #14
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OK I fixed my issue. Extract is a strange command and I usually don't use it but every now and then I give it another chance. If you select the stray area right then between the extract and the history brush it does a nice job on this particular image. It does not always work but it is fast and worth a try.


Another way to use it is to use a duplicate layer then protect transparent pixels and fill with white, add a layer under this and fill with black. Now you merge these 2 layers, select all and copy. Add mask to your original layer and then using the alt key select the mask (this shows just the mask) now paste. You have pasted the result of extract as a mask and can start editing this mask further to finish the job.


To sum up the Extract function is not a substitute for complex manual masking, but under in the right circumstances it can create effective & complicated masks quickly.


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Old Mar 2, 2006, 1:18 AM   #15
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Dashboard,
I realize that this post is way after all the other ones, but I thought I'd point something out. I have used a greenscreen for video for a couple years. I never bothered to buy an actual chromakey greenscreen, but instead went to Jo-Ann fabrics and bought 8 yards of 1-yard-wide neon green felt. It worked really well in video and I've been working on using it in photography, too.
Just remember that greenscreen doesn't work too well with light-haired people. For them, I would try black or even blue. The point is, for portrait photography, you don't necessarily need the very expensive "official" screens. Also, to make the color and lighting a little more smooth, have the subject step away from it a little and use a wide aperture. The less DOF, the better.
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Old Mar 2, 2006, 8:41 AM   #16
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thanks for the reply, At the time I hadn't done much work with green screens of any kind. And I had just over head track lights in my tiny little basement, where the blonde kids sat on the floor, right up against the screen that wasn't lit properly. And the green reflected into every orfice on them ! :roll:To add to that, when I tried to post it, I killed it by saving it as a low resolution, instead of resizing the image. Since then, I have bought two soft box strobes, an umbrella strobe, a black background, and white (they all came in the kit) And I think with all of your help, I have learned alot when dealing with cutting out things.



THANK YOU ALL!!
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Old Mar 2, 2006, 9:27 AM   #17
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Since this thread has re surfaced, since I posted my piece on extract not been the terrible tool most of us thought it was when we first tried to play with it, Dr Brown has done this video tutorial and I think you will agree it has a goo position in the workflow of an extraction. Like all tools it will not serve 100% of your jobs but what tool does, that is why we have so many

Check it out : Advanced Background Extraction (wait for loading of movie)

check out any others at the main tips area
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